Trajectory of dementia: is it different for people with Down syndrome?

man_DS-phone_shutterstock_157225547 (2)

Down syndrome is the most common cause of learning disability in the UK and increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s dementia is well documented.

In her debut blog, Silvana Mengoni looks at a paper which uses three case studies to consider some interesting trajectories of dementia which raise some interesting questions.

[read the full story...]
Share this post: Share on Facebook Tweet this on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+ Share via email

Using actors with learning disabilities during training to improve doctors’ communication and diagnostic skills

Group-2

Poor communication between people with learning disabilities, their carers and health professionals has been cited as an element of the explanation of health inequalities faced by people with learning disabilities.

In his debut blog, Tom Crossland looks at one study which used actors with learning disabilities as ‘standardised patients’ in the training of medical students in order to see if this might improve communication and diagnostic skills.

[read the full story...]

Individual Service Funds work well for people, but we also need to learn from when things don’t go so well

better_lives

Individual Service Funds offer the opportunity for flexible, person centred responses by providers. But in order to achieve this flexibility, commissioners need to break down larger block contracts to make funds available.

Here, Nick Burton looks at an evaluation of such a disaggregation of funds that took place in the London Borough of Southwark.

[read the full story...]

Can self-injurious behaviour be reduced by medication in individuals with intellectual disabilities?

shutterstock_150474224

Self injurious behaviour in people with learning disabilities, as well as causing physical harm, can have a major impact on quality of life. It is not entirely clear why people engage in self injurious behaviours, but one theory suggests that it may be connected with an opiate euphoria. If this is so, it might be that medications that blocked these opiates might impact on levels of SIB.

Here, Rachel Allen looks at a systematic review that set out to address that question.

[read the full story...]

Inpatient mindfulness group improves self-reported intrapersonal skills

stress_reduction_shutterstock_127699331 (2)

Mindfulness has been offered as a way to help reduce stress in family and carers but few studies have as yet looked directly at the effects of offering mindfulness-based interventions to people with learning disabilities themselves.

In her debut blog, Leen Vereenhooghe looks at an attempt to evaluate a mindfulness group in an inpatient assessment and treatment unit through the experiences of those who took part.

[read the full story...]

Bridging The Health Gap. An incentivised Scheme for Primary Care GP’s

Health information

People with learning disabilities experience health inequalities compared to the general population, compounded by the number of health related problems thye may have related to having a learning disability.

Here, in her debut blog, Tara Quinn-Cirillo adds her reflections to an assessment of this incentivised scheme.

[read the full story...]

Self-injurious behaviour: we need better research to understand this complex issue

Breakdown

Self injurious behaviour usually directly results in physical harm to an individual and can also seriously impact on their quality of life

Here, Kate van Dooren looks at a review of the literature relating to behavioural interventions for self-injurious behaviours, which sets out to consider the implications of this literature for training and managerial support.

[read the full story...]

Trial-Based Functional Analysis has limited validity outside of defined clinical settings

assess_shutterstock_257623312 (2)

Responses to behaviour that challenges are far more likely to be successful if based on good quality functional analysis.

In his debut blog, Russell Woolgar considers the effectiveness of Trial Based Functional Assessment, and looks at a systematic review which also aims to identify future areas for research.

[read the full story...]

Self-concept amongst adults with mild learning disabilities is good, but can be strengthened with practitioner support

Annabelle_Tristan-3

A positive self concept has been associated with psychological well-being, peer acceptance and self-confidence, but how do people with mild learning disabilities view themselves?

In this, his debut blog, Alex Leeder looks at a qualitative study that set out to provide us with a deeper understanding of how adults with learning disabilities think about themselves and how practitioners could help them to think about this more positively.

[read the full story...]

The role of carers in monitoring health of people with learning disabilities

healthy_life_shutterstock_149497187 (2)

People with learning disabiilties can have complex health needs which require monitoring and management. This can be challenging for their supporters, who may lack the knowledge necessary.

Here, in her debut blog, Emma Langley looks at a study which explored some of the challenges faced by paid and family carers in monitoring health in the context of the complexities of inter agency working between the health and social sectors.

[read the full story...]
Share this post: Share on Facebook Tweet this on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+ Share via email